Now you can login using your social network passwords,

 

Login with your

RPX RPX RPX RPX RPX

 

Please login below

   
www.disability.ie will have no access to any personal information or passwords on these accounts.  

 

Wed08232017

Last updateSun, 06 Nov 2016 10am

Back You are here: Home Entitlements Entitlements Housing Local Authority Housing

Local Authority Housing


These changes might include making the home wheelchair-accessible, moving light switches, door handles, installing a ground floor bathroom and toilet.

Rules]
There is no income limit for eligibility.

Both local authority tenants and owner-occupiers may be eligible, as long as their home is at least one year old. Housing association tenants may be eligible in exceptional circumstances. Private rented tenants are not eligible.

If you are a local authority tenant, the local authority will meet the entire cost.

If you are an owner-occupier, up to 90% of the cost may be granted, generally up to a maximum of 20,320 euro. If you are unable to get a loan from a bank or building society to pay for the other 10%, you may be able to get a local authority home improvement loan.

The grant will not be paid if you start work before the grant is approved.

When the local authority receives your application, it will ask your health board to assess your circumstances.

How To Apply
Applications to your local authority for this grant must be accompanied by a detailed itemised estimate of the cost of the work from the contractor (i.e., the person carrying out the work). Your application should also include specifications of the proposed work and you must include the contractor's income tax number and VAT number.

When your local authority receives your application it will contact your health board to arrange a call to your home by an occupational therapist who will be required to provide a report back to the local authority. You should contact the Housing Department of your local authority for further information.

Where to apply
Contact the Housing Department of your local authority for further information.

For Local Authorities In Your Area Click Here

Other housing options include :

Local Authority Housing
Local authorities in Ireland are the main provider of housing for people who need housing and cannot afford to buy their own homes. Local authority housing is allocated according to housing need, and rents are based on your ability to pay.

Housing associations (sometimes called "voluntary housing" or "voluntary housing associations") and housing co-operatives also provide housing for people who cannot afford to buy their own homes.

Rules

Qualifying for local authority housing
If you think you may qualify, you should apply to your local authority, which will take account of factors such as your household size, income, your present accommodation (if any), the condition of that accommodation and any special circumstances, including age, disability, medical circumstances, etc. Some local authorities in Ireland impose an income limit on applicants. Someone from the local authority may visit you to assess your present housing circumstances.

There is nothing to stop you applying to more than one local authority, for example, you might register on a county council list, in addition to an urban district council in that area. Local authorities have the power to accept applications from people who do not live in their area, but practice varies from area to area.

Local authority housing waiting lists
If you are accepted by the local authority as being in need of housing, you are then placed in the local authority housing waiting list. Each local authority draws up its own rules for deciding order of priority on the waiting list, called "'schemes of letting priorities". You can get a copy from your local authority. Some local authorities operate a points system. Each household on the waiting list is given a number of points depending on its circumstances. The greater your housing need, the more points you get.

You may be able to specify areas where you would like to live, but you should remember that if you choose a popular area, you may wait longer for an offer of housing than if you choose a less popular area.

As houses become available to your local authority for letting (renting out), they are allocated from the waiting list in order of priority, taking account of all the relevant circumstances. If you want to know your position on the waiting list, your local authority will inform you. You should remember that your position may go up or down depending on the circumstances of other people on the housing waiting list and as your own circumstances change. In practice, priority is generally given to families and elderly people rather than single people or couples without children.

If you are offered a house you do not want, you can refuse it. But if the local authority thinks that you do not have a good reason for refusing the offer of the house, it may reduce your priority on the waiting list, particularly if you refuse more than one offer.

Local authority housing is unfurnished. If you are offered a local authority home and you do not have and cannot afford to buy furniture or appliances, you may be eligible for help from your local health board. Contact the Community Welfare Officer for more information about this.

Eligibility for other housing measures
Once you are registered on the waiting list, you may be eligible for other housing measures, for example, housing association homes, Shared Ownership, a low cost housing site, improvement works in lieu of local authority housing, a local authority improvement loan, a local authority mortgage or the Affordable Housing Scheme.

Rents
Local authority rents are based on a system called "differential rents". This means that the rent is based on your ability to pay, so if your income is low, your rent will be low; and if your income increases, so will your rent. The income of any other members of your household will be added to the rent calculation and there may be deductions for any children in your family. Each local authority operates its own rent scheme.

Your local authority may have a minimum and/or maximum rent, which may depend on the size of your home. There is also a hardship clause that gives local authorities discretion to reduce the rent if there are particular reasons to do this.

If your income or the income of anyone in your family changes, you must inform the local authority.

How to apply
Contact the Housing Department of your local authority. A list of housing associations throughout Ireland is available here.

Getting a transfer to another local authority home
If you want to move to another local authority home, you can register on the transfer list. In order to qualify for the transfer list, you must usually have lived in your home for a minimum period of years, you must not have any rent arrears and your home must be in good condition.
You can arrange a private transfer by finding someone who wants to swap his/her home with yours. This must not result in any overcrowding and the local authority must give its permission.
You can also arrange a private transfer with someone from a different authority or even between Great Britain and Ireland as long as the accommodation is suitable and the local authorities agree.

Housing associations
Housing associations, sometimes called "voluntary housing associations" or "voluntary housing", are independent non-profit making organisations that provide rented housing for people who cannot afford to buy their own homes or special groups, such as older people or homeless people.
Voluntary housing associations are usually formed to relieve a local housing need. Many of these voluntary associations are established by existing caring/voluntary associations that provide services to special needs groups such as older people or people with disabilities. A marked feature of the voluntary housing sector is that many associations also offer non-housing services such as group meals, social activities and welfare advice.

Home-ownership co-operatives are a particular form of housing association, in which tenants share responsibility for the management and upkeep of their homes.

Rules
In order to be housed by a housing association, you must be registered on the local authority housing waiting list in your area and there may also be an income or means test.

Housing association tenants have basically the same rights as local authority tenants, however, housing association tenants do not have the right to buy their homes.

How to apply
The Housing department of your local authority will be able to tell you if there are housing associations active in your area. Alternatively, you can search for contact information about housing associations in Ireland here

Where to apply
Your local authority.


The Irish Council for Social Housing (ICSH), which was formed by housing and hostel organisations in 1982, acts as a national representative, promotional, information and advisory federation.
The ICSH now represents over 200 affiliated housing associations and other voluntary organisations throughout Ireland that are involved in housing or hostel services. These voluntary organisations provide homes to over 15,000 older people, homeless and vulnerable people, people with disabilities and individuals and families on low incomes.
Irish Council for Social Housing 50 Merrion Square East
Dublin 2
Tel: (01) 661 8334
Fax: (01) 661 0320
E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
www.icsh. ie

Anti-social behaviour
Local authorities and housing associations have specific powers to evict anyone who is engaging in anti-social behaviour. This means being involved in drug dealing or any behaviour that might cause danger, injury, damage or fear to people living in the area. This might include violence, threats, intimidation or harassment.

How to apply
A tenant may him/herself apply for an exclusion order against a member of his/her household who is engaging in anti-social behaviour. However, this may be very difficult for the victim of anti-social behaviour to do.As an alternative to the tenant taking action, the local authority or housing association can apply to the District Court for an exclusion order against any member of a household who is engaging in anti-social behaviour. The order may exclude that person from a specific house or from an entire estate and it may forbid intimidation or other interference with a tenant or anyone else.A local authority can refuse to let a dwelling or sell one under the tenant purchase scheme on the grounds of anti-social behaviour.

Health boards may refuse or withdraw rent supplement for a private rented dwelling where the person in question was evicted, excluded or removed from local authority housing on the grounds of anti-social behaviour.

If you are a local authority tenant who is affected by someone's anti-social behaviour, you should contact your local authority. If you are a housing association tenant who is affected by someone's anti-social behaviour, you should contact the housing association.

Improvement works in lieu of local authority housing
This scheme enables local authorities to improve or extend privately owned houses as an alternative to providing local authority housing. It is aimed at:

Owner-occupiers whose homes are overcrowded or sub-standard and who cannot afford to carry out improvements and Local authority tenants or tenant purchasers or housing association tenants who want to move into a home owned by a relative but cannot because the home is sub-standard or too small.
If you qualify, the local authority will carry out works to get rid of defects in the home or to provide extra bedrooms. The local authority will pay the full costs of the works carried out and you will then pay a charge to the local authority for a maximum of 15 years. If during the 15 year period, you have paid an amount equal to the total cost of the works, the charge will stop.
The charge will be worked out in a similar way to the differential rent scheme local authority rents so it is based on your ability to pay.

Rules
You may qualify if you are:

 


  • Registered on the local authority housing waiting list
  • A local authority tenant or a tenant purchaser and you want to buy a private house and return your present house to the local authority
  • A tenant for more than one year of a home provided by a housing association under the Rental Subsidy Scheme and you want to buy a private house and return your present house to the local authority.
  • The local authority will take into account the urgency of your housing needs and the cost-effectiveness of the proposal when deciding whether to improve your house or your relative's house.

You can sell the house at any time. However, if you do so during the 15 year period of charges or before your total payments equal the cost of the works, you will have to make a repayment to the authority.

How to apply
Contact your local authority.

Where to apply
Contact your local authority.

Inheriting a tenancy
Normally a relative who has been living with a tenant is able to take over the tenancy if the tenant dies. Local authority practice varies on this; some will require the relative to have lived in the house for a minimum number of years, others will only allow the relative to take over the tenancy if the housing is suitable for their needs.

Since many housing associations are relatively new, not all will have established policies on this. If you are a housing association tenant, contact your housing association.

How to apply
Contact your local authority or housing association.

Where to apply
Contact your local authority or housing association.

Local authority home improvement loans
Local authority loans are available to owner-occupiers for the carrying out of necessary works to improve, repair or extend their existing houses.

You are entitled to tax relief on the interest of such loans.

Rules
You may be eligible for a local authority home improvement loan if you can show the local authority that you cannot get a loan from a bank or building society and:




  • Your house needs improving, repairing or extending due to overcrowding and your income satisfies the income test below, or
  • You are registered on a housing waiting list with a local authority, or
  • You are a local authority tenant or a tenant purchaser and you want to buy a private house and return your present house to the local authority, or
  • You are a tenant for more than one year of a home provided by a housing association under the Rental Subsidy Scheme Your rights as a housing association tenant and you want to buy a private house and return your present house to the local authority.
  • Note that the income test only applies to the first category; if you are covered by the second, third or fourth category you are exempt from the income test.


Rates

The maximum improvement loans are:

19,046.07 euro on offshore islands - or
7,618.43 euro where there is no mortgage.

How to apply
Contact your local authority.

Where to apply
Contact your local authority.

Notice to quit and eviction

Local authority tenants
Legally the local authority can evict you without any reason as long as the correct procedure is followed. This means first issuing a "notice to quit" and then applying to court for an order. However, in practice, local authorities do not evict their tenants without reason and if you pay your rent and comply with other conditions of the tenancy, you will normally be able to stay in your home for as long as you want.

Housing association tenants
Although the legislation is different, housing associations, like local authorities, can evict you without any reason as long as they follow the correct procedure. This means first issuing a "notice to quit" and then applying to court for an order. However, in practice, housing associations do not evict their tenants without reason and if you pay your rent and comply with other conditions of the tenancy, you will normally be able to stay in your home for as long as you want.

If you are in temporary accommodation provided by a housing association, your position is much weaker and legally the housing association does not even need to issue a "notice to quit". Again, however, in practice, housing associations do not evict their tenants without reason.

Joint tenancy and relationship breakdown
If you have a joint tenancy and your relationship with your joint tenant has broken down and he/she has left the home, you will probably not want his/her name on your rent book.

Rules
If your joint tenant agrees to have his/her name taken off the rent book, the local authority or housing association will do this. However, if he/she refuses to have his/her name removed, it is more complicated and you will have to provide evidence that the relationship has broken down.

If you are a partner left living alone in the family home, the local authority or housing association may consider that your house is too big for you and offer you alternative accommodation, unless you can argue that you have occasional custody of your children and need somewhere for them to stay.

How to apply
Contact your local authority or housing association.

Where to apply
Contact your local authority or housing association.

Rent arrears
The most common difficulty tenants get into is rent arrears. If for whatever reason you are falling behind with the rent, it is vital to talk to your local authority or housing association and explain your situation. It is in everyone's interest to sort the problem out without having to evict you. But if you cannot pay your rent and you do nothing about it, you may end up losing your home. If you are in financial difficulty, the local authority or housing association should be able to help you sort this out and pay a little bit off the rent arrears each week. You should also get advice from Money Advice and Budgeting Service.

How to apply
Get advice from your local authority or housing association and a Money Advice and Budgeting Service.

Where to apply
Contact your local authorityor housing association. Contact information for your nearest Money Advice and Budgeting Service(also known as MABS) is available here

Your rights as a housing association tenant

Where to apply
Your rights as a housing association tenant are very similar to those of local authority tenants, with one major difference: as a housing association tenant, you do not have the right to buy your house from the housing association.

It is important to know that there are two types of housing association housing, each funded under a different scheme: the Capital Assistance Scheme and the Capital Loan and Subsidy Scheme. Most people housed under the Capital Assistance Scheme are in housing for special groups such as older people or homeless people, whereas most people housed under the Capital Loan and Subsidy Scheme are families. Prospective tenants eligible under both schemes from the local authority waiting list. The difference is very important because it may affect your eligibility for different schemes. If you are not certain of your eligibility, you should check with your housing association.

If you want to know more about your security of tenure, that is, how easy it is for you to be evicted, you can read more information about notice to quit and eviction here.

If you are getting behind with your rent and you want to know what to do about it, you can read more information about rent arrears here.

If you are a joint tenant and your relationship with your joint tenant has ended and he/she has left, you can read more information about housing and relationship breakdown here.

If you want to know what you or the housing association can do about anti-social behaviour, you can read more about anti-social behaviour and housing here.

If you want to know more about passing on a tenancy if someone dies, you should to contact the housing association in question to establish its policy on this.

If you want to know who is responsible for different types of repair and the minimum physical standards you are entitled to, you can read more about repairs, maintenance and minimum physical standards here.

If you or someone you know has a physical or intellectual disability or mental health problems and your home requires alteration in order to make it suitable, you may be entitled to a Disabled Persons Housing Grant.

Help with buying your own home
As a housing association tenant, you may be entitled to one or more of a number of schemes that have been set up to help you buy your own home if you give up your housing association home. You may qualify for these schemes if you are housed under the Capital Assistance Scheme or the Capital loan and Subsidy scheme. You may qualify for the Shared Ownership Scheme, the Mortgage Allowance Scheme, a low cost housing site, a local authority mortgage, a local authority improvement loan or the Affordable Housing Scheme.

Help with moving into a relative's house
If you want to move into a house that is owned by a relative but you cannot because it is sub-standard or too small, you can find out more about improvement works in lieu of local authority housing here.

Where to apply
The housing department of your local authority will be able to tell you if there are housing associations active in your area. Alternatively, you can search for contact information about housing associations in Ireland here.

The Irish Council for Social Housing (ICSH), which was formed by non-profit/voluntary housing associations in 1982, acts as a national representative, promotional, information and advisory federation for the voluntary housing sector.

The ICSH now represents over 200 affiliated housing associations and other voluntary organisations throughout Ireland that are involved in housing or hostel services. These voluntary organisations provide homes to over 15,000 older people, homeless and vulnerable people, people with disabilities and individuals and families on low incomes. Non-profit housing associations provide up to 30% of the total amount of social housing in Ireland each year.

Irish Council for Social Housing
50 Merrion Square East
Dublin 2
Tel: (01) 661 8334
Fax: (01) 661 0320
E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Local Authorities in Ireland

Wheelchairs

JA Teline IV
New to the market

Bathroom Design

JA Teline IV
Whats New in Bathroom Design

Health Matters

JA Teline IV
Staying Healthy

Rehabilitation

Avatar
Rehabilitation Providers