Now you can login using your social network passwords,

 

Login with your

RPX RPX RPX RPX RPX

 

Please login below

   
www.disability.ie will have no access to any personal information or passwords on these accounts.  

 

Wed05242017

Last updateSun, 06 Nov 2016 10am

Back You are here: Home Home Site Sections News Children with special needs much less likely to enjoy school

Children with special needs much less likely to enjoy school

THOUSANDS of young children with special needs are much less likely to enjoy school than their classmates, a new report has found.

Primary pupils with learning difficulties, a physical disability, or conditions such as Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) are up to twice as likely to dislike school as other pupils.

Their more negative attitudes are linked both to poorer engagement with school and homework and their relationships with teachers and other children.

The divide shows up in a new report from the Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), using data from the Growing Up in Ireland study of 8,578 nine-year-olds.

According to teachers surveyed in the study, 14pc of the pupils had a special need, which, across the entire primary system, would represent about 80,000 children.

The ESRI research, the first of its kind, focused on pupils in mainstream schools, now attended by greater numbers of children with special needs as part of the moves to make education more inclusive.

But the study, by Selina McCoy and Joanne Banks, raises concerns about the integration of children with special needs and the barriers they may face, even with the supports that are provided in schools.

Overall, the research shows that children with and without special needs are broadly positive about school, but the findings highlight differences between the two groups.

According to the study, 7pc of nine-year-olds reported that they "never like school", compared with almost 12pc of children identified with some type of special need. Out of a total of about 80,000 primary pupils with special needs, it could mean about 10,000 are not happy at school.

Experiences varied depending on the type of need or disability, and a dislike of school was highest among those with learning difficulties (13pc), an emotional or behavioural disorder (14pc) and those with multiple needs (13pc).

DISENGAGED

The most disengaged are boys with special needs and children with special needs from semi-skilled and unskilled social class backgrounds. Researchers say the more negative attitudes are closely associated with low levels of academic engagement, in areas such as reading, maths and homework, and poorer relations with teachers and other pupils.

The study concludes that: "Inclusion cannot simply be a changed in location from special to mainstream schools, but something which involves a broader examination of the current curriculum, methods of teaching and school climate."

The Department of Education said the National Council for Special Education had recently commissioned research on the Growing Up in Ireland data with a view to providing a better understanding of how children with special educational needs are faring at school.

Irish Independent